Boxelder Bugs

ABOUT BOXELDER BUGS

Boxelder Bugs are a major pest of boxelder trees. The enter the structures overwinter. When crushed, they produce a strong odor and they will occasionally bite people.

Adults are about 1/2" long with an oval, flattened head. They are black with reddish lines with an antenna about half the length of the body. Their wings are like cellophane. Nymphs are similar to adults but lack wings. Females lay clusters of straw-yellow egg on stones, leaves, grass, shrubs and trees. Eggs turn red as they develop in two weeks.

CONTROL OF BOXELDER BUGS

Control begins outside! Reduce harborage and seal points of entry. Change light bulbs to less attractive yellow and screen all vents with at least 16-mesh screening. Ask us about preventative barriers! We treat areas where they nest on building and get into the interiors.

CHARACTERISTICS OF BOXELDER BUGS

Adults emerge from hibernation (late April to early May) when the boxelder buds open and fly back to their host trees. They feed on seeds and developing leaves and are also found on silver maple trees. In the fall, large masses congregate and may fly to nearby building to hibernate. Fecal material may cause a red stain on curtain, drapes, clothing and resting places.